Author Topic: How to import RAW or DNG files sequence directly into Premiere (Cs6 or CC)?  (Read 47526 times)

Dani

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Is there any plugin that do this?

I used the gingerhd plugin on premiere cs6 but it works with 8 bit.



Premiere Pro CC can't import the DNG filse (but they said that CC could do that so why it doesn't works?)
I read somewhere that is because Adobe support only the dng files from blackmagic camera, and not the dng files from magic lantern.


My workflow right now is: RAW --> raw2dng.exe --> resolve lite 11 ---> premiere pro

But it take so much time to do that.


Anyone have better worklow ideas?

barepixels

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i have not test this but try using adobe dng convertor to convert ML dng to adobe dng
5D2 + nightly ML

chmee

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you need CinemaDNG with 12 or 16bit.

windows : fi raw2cdng or mlrawviewer
mac : fi rawmagic or mlrawviewer

regards chmee

Dani

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Yes! You are right.

It works.


I have only few more question: as my computer can't handle the 16 bit dng files, will i lost much information if i use the cinema dng 12 bit files?

With the 12 bit files my premiere pro cc 8 seeems to work more stable. With 16 bit files it goes slowly and it's impossiboe to edit (it's because i don't have enough ram and a good graphic card i guess)

Dani

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EDIT


It used to workd, but now crash so often.

Anyway thanks :)

DFM

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12-bit files would work in theory, if they were created properly - but the current batch of tools leaves them with broken highlights. Only the 16-bit versions from Chmee's app will import correctly into Premiere Pro CC. Scrubbing a 12-bit cDNG sequence isn't any significant amount less work for the CPU than a 16-bit sequence, and the bottlenecks are usually in disc read speeds.

CinemaDNG support for ML files was not an intended feature in Premiere Pro (or in any of CC) - it's an accidental by-product of Adobe's support for Blackmagic footage, so files from those cameras are the only types with any guarantee of correct debayering.


Right now, if you want fast scrubbing in Pr and you have the full CC subscription, my suggestion is to encode log mezzanines using After Effects (which will read CinemaDNG or regular "still" DNG sequences just the same). These aren't "proxies" as you will use them for output, but they play in real-time even on a laptop.

  • Create the DNGs through one of the tools listed on these forums
  • Import to After Effects by selecting the first frame and checking the "import as footage" option
  • Change the comp to 16-bit (Alt/Opt click on the bit depth icon in the Project panel)
  • Use the 'interpret footage > advanced' option to open the DNG sequence in Camera Raw
  • You can apply noise reduction, lens corrections and change exposure, but do NOT touch the other sliders (blacks, whites, contrast,etc).
  • Recommended: Apply a LOG camera profile (CineLog or VisionLog) to make the footage "flat"
  • Export the comp to a Quicktime-wrapped mezzanine codec such as Cineform, DNxHD 10-bit or Grass Valley - which you use depends on your operating system. Don't export to AVI as they are always 8-bit.
  • Import the MOV files into Premiere Pro - visually they'll be 95% the same as the cDNG footage, so they're fine for most applications. If you really need pixel-perfect output from the cDNG frames you can offline and relink the clips before export (but in that case it'd be simpler to use Premiere Pro's internal proxy system directly on the cDNG footage).
  • If you applied a log profile in ACR, to get the linear footage back just apply a Lumetri effect and use the Log>Rec709 LUT provided by the people who made the camera profile; or grade directly in Speedgrade (technically Sg expects a different curve to CineLog/VisionLog, but for most people the visual discrepancy is too small to care about)

Dani

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Thank you very much for the specific answer :)


So if i import my dng files into after effects, then change setting to 16 bit and then export the MOV i will have a file similiar to the dng footage, and in premiere i will also do some color correction having the same flexibility as the dng footage?
I will try.


Anyway, my computer seems to manage better the 12 bit cdng files then the 16 bit.

I can't handle the 16 bit dng files and do a proper edit in real time on premiere.
I will try to export them from AE and then put in premiere.

DFM

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Yes, that's correct. By compressing to Quicktime with one of those codecs the file is much easier to play back and scrub through. Because it compresses to 10-bit you'll find it helps to use the log conversion profile - for basic grading you probably wouldn't notice, but extreme changes in Premiere would pull out some banding in the whites and blacks if you kept everything in linear space.

So if i import my dng files into after effects, then change setting to 16 bit and then export the MOV i will have a file similiar to the dng footage, and in premiere i will also do some color correction having the same flexibility as the dng footage?

Canon eos m

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Great advice! Will try the suggested workflow.
Canon 5D Mark III, Gopro Hero Blacks with 3D Casing, A Few Lenses, Adobe CC 2014, MacBook Pro, Windows 8 PC, Lots of Video Rig!

Started Nuke. Loved it but then the 15 day trial ran out. Back to After Effects and loving it :-)

Danne

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@DFM. How is the noise refuction in acr compared to let, s say neat image?

DFM

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That's a subjective question - both ACR and Neat do perfectly good noise reduction, and for less-than-extreme cases I don't think anyone would notice the difference. Which you prefer for really pushing things is a matter of taste.

The most important thing when really hammering out high noise levels is to put some grain back afterwards, otherwise it looks fake. Don't use ACR's "grain" controls though, as they apply the same pattern to every frame. You need to use an effect in AE or Pr to do it, either synthetic gaussian noise or a stock clip of grain.

Danne

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will try the grain suggestion. Thanks

mucher

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I remember that g3gg0 once mentioned that you can import all the dng/cdng sequences into AE, then save AE project, then import the AE project into Premiere. It works for me, thanks, but I am not much a user.

BTW, MLviewer couldn't convert to dng in my PC

DFM

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I remember that g3gg0 once mentioned that you can import all the dng/cdng sequences into AE, then save AE project, then import the AE project into Premiere. It works for me, thanks, but I am not much a user.

Yes you can (we call that Direct Link) but you won't get responsive playback in Pr, as you're still debayering frames as you go.

stevefal

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Not sure why you think so. I'm currently using 12-bit full-HD DNGs (5D3) from RAWMagic, and they're playing back nicely in real time. PPro CC 2104, MacbookPro Retina mid-2012 quad i7.

The only issue I'm seeing, which brought me here, is that the preview image while playing is slightly softer than when still, or when rendered. It looks like PPro might be cutting a corner during playback, possibly for better performance.

I notice this only with my new large grading monitor, so it is subtle.

Has anyone else seen that?

[EDIT] by the way, my experience with RAW in CC2014 has me virtually decided to switch to this workflow. And I positively swore by ACR>AE>ProRES 4444 previously. But man, those AE rendering times.
Steve Falcon

jrumans

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On a side note, they are working to fix the broken highlights with CDNGs files in Premiere Pro, voice your opinion here if you'd like:

https://forums.adobe.com/message/6595173#6595173
Sometimes you have to go out on a limb to get the fruit.