Author Topic: Aperture bracketing example  (Read 14835 times)

trase

  • New to the forum
  • *
  • Posts: 22
  • 600D
Aperture bracketing example
« on: October 13, 2012, 06:33:31 PM »
Trying out the new aperture/DOF bracketing feature that can be found in the latest Magic Lantern nightly.

I use it to shoot two consecutive pictures at different aperture - in this case f1.8 and f7.1 - and later combine them in order to get a picture with shallow DOF and yet with the subject at optimum sharpness.



(view at 100% to be able to appreciate the effect)

forum thread: http://www.magiclantern.fm/forum/index.php?topic=3045.0

ilguercio

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 840
Re: Aperture bracketing example
« Reply #1 on: October 13, 2012, 06:41:43 PM »
Amazing, you're making a good use of this feature.
Also, is there a particular workflow to ensure a perfect blending of the images?
If so, i guess a tutorial would be really appreciated.
:)
Canon EOS 6D, 60D, 50D.
Sigma 70-200 EX OS HSM, Sigma 70-200 Apo EX HSM, Samyang 14 2.8, Samyang 35 1.4, Samyang 85 1.4.
Proud supporter of Magic Lantern.

a1ex

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9565
  • 5D Mark Free
Re: Aperture bracketing example
« Reply #2 on: October 13, 2012, 06:47:07 PM »
Looks fantastic!

Can you show the two original shots, before blending?

trase

  • New to the forum
  • *
  • Posts: 22
  • 600D
Re: Aperture bracketing example
« Reply #3 on: October 13, 2012, 07:47:52 PM »
Thanks, good to hear!

Here you can see the two original pictures, as well as the layer mask:


The method I use for combining the pictures is fairly quick and straightforward, and gives a lot of control:
I open the two pictures in photoshop, copy and paste the sharp one as a layer on top of the blurry one. (If you were shooting on a tripod the pictures will align perfectly, otherwise you may have to move the layer around a bit until they match).
Create a layer mask. Paint it black (zero opacity).
Using the ordinary airbrush tool I paint in the parts that I want sharp.

A special thanks to you again a1ex for implementing this feature!

discocalculi

  • Freshman
  • **
  • Posts: 63
Re: Aperture bracketing example
« Reply #4 on: October 15, 2012, 07:00:17 AM »
Looks good. The clarity is really remarkable in your example.

I've found the exposure values a bit confusing (I assume 1 exposure step is 1 aperture step)

trase

  • New to the forum
  • *
  • Posts: 22
  • 600D
Re: Aperture bracketing example
« Reply #5 on: October 15, 2012, 06:52:34 PM »
Thank you.
I agree, the exposure values aren't totally intuitive when you're used to just choosing the aperture value. But as you say, 1 exposure step is 1 aperture step - I usually use an increment of either 3 or 4 EV.

bart

  • Senior
  • ****
  • Posts: 387
Re: Aperture bracketing example
« Reply #6 on: October 16, 2012, 09:03:38 AM »
Great idea. I think this is a better alternative for subtle focus stacking. At least the procedure is much faster and works even on insects in the field when the wind lays low for a tiny moment. I hope I can still find some insects to try it out.

jbuy41

  • Freshman
  • **
  • Posts: 94
Re: Aperture bracketing example
« Reply #7 on: October 30, 2012, 01:37:46 PM »
Could you provide me the steps used in Aperture brackting?

I download the latest nightly and still have problems using stack and cannot find Aperture bracking in the menu.

Cannot find a way to control the number of pictures that are snapped.  Get one or two.  Changed step to 1,2, and 3, with no change.  Even if it says + or - steps from end point.

I cannot find documentation that gives you step by step procedures that work.  Am I the only one that is having problems?

nanomad

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2918
  • All your websites are belong to us
Re: Aperture bracketing example
« Reply #8 on: October 30, 2012, 02:14:21 PM »
Don't use nightly builds, stick to the stable release
EOS 1100D | EOS 650 (No, I didn't forget the D) | Ye Olde Canon EF Lenses ('87): 50 f/1.8 - 28 f/2.8 - 70-210 f/4 | EF-S 18-55 f/3.5-5.6 | Metz 36 AF-5